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Full text of "Wellesley news"

College flewe 



Vol. 8 No. 7 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1908 



Price 5 Cents 



Student Government Meeting 

A Studert Government Meeting was 
called Friday, at 4.15 in College Hall Chap- 
el. After the reading of the secretary's 
report, Miss Smith gave the report of the 
Fire Brigade, saying that there had been 
marked improvement in the second fire- 
drill in College Hall. The report of the 
trustees was read in regard to the Stu- 
dents' Building, and much applause greeted 
the announcement that the request had 
been granted, and that permission had been 
given tj start a fund for the building. 
Miss H aford urged the co-operation of 
the who college. She said that the alum- 
nae wer 'iack of us to help, and that by 
our wor, we could show the trustees that 
we' are \. Uy in earnest. Miss Raymond 
spoke . ol the work of the International 
Institute League last year and expressed a be- 
lief that the work this year would un- 
doubtedly be greater and that Senorita 
Marcial, whose presence was such an in- 
spiration last year, ought to have the same 
influence this year. Miss Ruth Fletcher 
was elected chairman of the College 
League Committee for this year. Miss 
Hanford made several announcements: — 
that the Executive Board had de- 
cided that Roman Catholics would be per- 
mitted to attend church services in Na- 
tick and Xewton Low-er Falls; also 
that notice would be posted later in 
regard to members of non-evangelical 
churches. Miss Hanford spoke of the 
care that should be taken of the behavior 
of girls on the train to and from Boston. 
She then read the acknowledgement sent 
by Pres. Taft of our telegram, sent upon 
his election. The announcement was made 
that Miss Belle Mapes had been appointed 
head of singing for this year. A letter 
was read from Miss Hazard expressing 
her hope to be back with us in the spring. 
Miss Zabriskie spoke for the interest of 
cheering, and asked the girls to wait until 
after the musical cheer before leaving cen- 
ter. This, she said, seemed to her merely 
a matter of courtesy to the college. Also, 
she urged the girls to realize that a spirit 
of reverence was due in chapel — especially 
emphasizing the need of this spirit at ves- 
pers. Miss Randall reported from the re- 
cent meeting at Mt. Holyoke, dwelling 
particularly upon the cordiality of the girls 
there. Miss Hanford gave the report of 
the business side of the convention. The 
comparison, she said, of the work of the 



different colleges was very interesting and 
showed that Wellcsley stood very near 
ad. The thing in which we and othei 
colleges fail is that we are not yet as 
strong as we should be in our individual 
feeling of responsibility, and the funda- 
mental question in solving this is the mat- 
ter of quiet. In solving that, we solve ev- 
erything. Miss Hanford expressed a wish 
that by next year this problem will have 
been solved. The meeting was thrown 
open for a ew moments to a discus 
sion of this matter of quiet. Perhaps, the 
most interesting suggestion made was that 
of Miss Shepard, who was in favor of do- 
ing away with the proctoring system. This 
suggestion was received very favorably 
and Miss Hanford asked each girl to think 
of the matter seriously. The meeting 
closed with the announcement that the 
transept doors would be closed hereafter, 
in chapel, at the close of the first hymn, 
at vespers as well as at morning chapel. 



"When wilt Thou save the people? 

O God of mercy, when ? 
Not Kings and Lords, but nations! 
Not thrones and crowns, but men ! 
Flowers of Thy heart, O God, are they: 
Let them not pass, like weeds, away — 
Their heritage a sunless way 
God save the people ! 

"Shall crime bring crime for ever, 

Strength aiding still the strong? 

Is it Thy will, O Father, 

That man shall toil for wrong? 

'No,' say Th mountains; 'No,' Thy skies; 

Man's sun shall highly rise, 

And S' .id instead of sighs. 

God eople ! 

"When wilt 1 nou save the people? 
O God of mercy, when? 
The people, Lord, the people, 
Not thrones and crowns, but men ! 
God save the people; Thine they are, 
Thy children, as Thine angels fair; 
From vice, oppression, and despair, 
God save the people !" 



College Settlements Meeting 

A meeting of the College Settlements 
Chapter was held in College Hall Chapel, 
Monday evening, November 16. Four 
amendments and three new sections to the 
constitution were adopted. Miss Ingalls 
gave a report of the meeting of the Col- 
lege Settlements Association, in Philadel- 
phia, two weeks previous. She then spoke 
of the field and scope of the College Set- 
tlements Association in America. The 
meeting adjourned to the Faculty Parlor 
where Miss Scudder spoke informally to 
the girls. 

Miss Scudder gave an interesting ac- 
count of her work among the Italians in 
the North End of Boston, and urged the 
girls to attend the Italian exhibition to be- 
erin December 2. in the new Franklin 
Building. The arts and crafts exhibits 
there are made entirely by the Italians. 
Miss Scudder spoke of the need for help 
which the College Settlements Association 
feels — the colleges stand behind it, both 
with their money and with their interest. 
She wanted the girls to feel that they were 
a part of a great movement, and gave a 
great many instances of the help they had 
given and can yet give. Miss Scudder sug- 
gested that the following hymn be adopted 
by the Wellesley Chapter: 



Gorham D. Abbot Memorial 

On November 11, 1908, at a meeting of 
the Abbot Collegiate Association, a gift of 
$1,000 was presented by the Association to 
Wellesley College. The income of this 
fund is to be used in the purchase of 
books on education for our library, the 
fund being in memory of Dr. Gorham D. 
Abbot. Dr. Abbot was at one time the 
principal of Spingler Institute, a famous 
school for young women fifty years ago in 
New York City. He was associated with 
Wellesley in that he knew the founder, 
and discussed with him those matters of 
education which interested them both so 
deeply. The last years of Dr. Abbot's life 
were passed in South Natick. The pur- 
pose of the Association which bears his 
name is to keep in touch with the ad- 
vanced educational ideas of the time and 
to be "a helper of colleges." It has but 
lately founded a fellowship at Vassar in 
memory of Dr. and Mrs. Abbot. Many 
members of the college will be interested 
to know that the leader of the movement 
was Mrs. Melville Emory Mead, principal 
of the Hillside School, Norwalk, Conn. 
The fund may thus be regarded as a me- 
morial of Mrs. Mead also. 

The ceremony of presentation was held 
in the Brick Church in New York City. 
Dr. Lyman Abbott made the speech of 
presentation ; and Mrs. Louise McCoy 
North, 1879, one of the trustees of the col- 
lege, received the gift in the absence of 
President Hazard. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College Bews 

Published weekly. Subscription price $1.00 a 
year to resident and non-resident. 

All business correspondence should be addressed to 
Miss Anna Brown, Business Manager, COLLEGE NEWS. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Miss bally 
King. 



Editor-in Chief, Emma L. Hawkridge, l'JIO 
Associate Editor, Isadore Douglas, 1'JlU 
Literary Editors, Carolyn Wilson, 1910 

Elizabeth Snyder, lalu, Kate Parsons, 1911 
Alumn* Editor, Elizabeth Manwanng, 1VM 
Business Manager, Anna Brown, ISHW 
Subscription Editor, bailie King, 1WJ 
Assistants 
ElizaLeth Nofsinger, l'Jlo Kidie Guion, 1911 



"Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1U03 at the Post Ohice at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of congress, March J 1;>7'J." 



EDITORIAL 

Is it really true that we have ceased to 
read for pleasure or recreation? And if 
we have, is it sufficient excuse that the 
reading involved in our various courses 
demands all our spare time? Here in 
college, the matter is not perhaps, of so 
great importance. We know that nearly 
every girl will have the same answer to 
our question concerning a recent work — 
".No indeed, 1 haven t read it or even 
seen it. l have to spend ail ray time 
studying." 

Do you not feel a little humiliated when 
you are away from college and some one 
asks "Have you read this?" or - 'Do you 
know that author?" and you are obliged 
to admit to your absolute ignorance? Sure- 
ly there are books coming out all the time, 
both fiction and those that deal with the 
more serious matters, which deserve our 
attention. We may not have time to read 
many, but at least we might know them 
by name with a view to making a closer 
acquaintance with them later. And by 
these books, I do not mean "the popular 
novel." 

It is this lack of interest in literary 



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Full particulars in catalogue. 

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Dr. L. D. H. FULLER 
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work, and this ignorance of current events 
and oi happenings of universal importance, 
which justifies in many cases, the criti- 
cisms which are made of college girls. We 
.'eel guiltilj conscious, whenever we are 
forced to admit that we have never heard 
of a certain prominent writer or are not 
familiar with some apparently well-known 
book, that a score is going down against 
us as college girls. We do not wish peo- 
ple to believe our development lies along 
only a few lines ; and this desire to hide our 
ignorance leads us into almost as much troub- 
le as the ignorance itself. We recollect 
an obscure Frenchman who did something in 
the Renaissance, with a vague look, and' then 
with a flashing smile of remembrance — as if 
we had not heard the question perfectly — 
and then we are safe again. Indeed, 
after a time there comes to be a certain 
fascination in covering up huge fields of 
ignorance with only the thinnest veil of 
tact — today we call it "bluff." 

We say that it requires cleverness and 
adaptability and many other things nec- 
essary to the furtherance of mere casual 
acquaintance and where is the harm, as 
long as we do not follow this course in 
our academic work? But some day we 
are discovered. We trip over the smallest 
obstacle of knowledge and our carefully 
reared hofise of card-wisdom lies empty 
and hollow, a mere shell, at our feet. 
We are known for what we are, "Just 
bluffs." 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



College Calendar 

Friday, November 27, 1.30 p. m. Thanksgiving recess ends. 

Saturday, November 28, 4.15 p. m., in the Barn, Senior recep- 
tion to the Freshman class. 
7.30 p. m. Barnswallows. 

Sunday, November 29, 11 a. m., services in Houghton Mem- 
orial Chapel. Sermon by Mr. Robert E. Speer. 
7 p. m. Vespers. Address by Mr. Speer. 

Monday, November 30, 7.30 p. m., in College Hall Chapel, 
Reading from Schiller's Maria Stuart, by Professor Kiih- 
nemann. 

Tuesday, December 1, 4.20 p. m., recital in Billings Hall. 



College Notes 

Miss Hazard will spend the winter in California. It is 
hoped that her health will be so much improved that she will 
be able to return to Wellesley by the spring term. 

At the meeting of the Social Study Circle, held Tuesday 
evening, November 17, Miss Jean Hamilton of Oswego, New 
York, spoke. Miss Hamilton is the general secretary of 
working girls' clubs, and talked most interestingly of her work 
and its results. Such clubs are purely social, she said, but 
they do much good, and she urged a greater interest from 
college girls in founding working girls' clubs over the country. 

The "housewarming" to celebrate the refurnishing and 
decorating of the Senior Parlor was held on Monday, Novem- 
ber 16. 

Forty members of the Freshman class were entertained at 
an afternoon tea by the officers of the Christian Association on 
Thursday, November 19. This is the first of a series of teas 
for Freshmen and new students to be held during the term. 

The Magazine Club met for the first time this year on 
Saturday evening, November 21, at the Agora House. Reports 
were made on the college papers of Yale and Williams, compar- 
ing their material and treatment with that of the Wellesley 
Magazine. A discussion of ways of improving our material 
by means of gaining greater variety in character, and of making 
the Magazine more truly characteristic of Wellesley, followed. 

Brigadier-General Philip Reade, U. S. A., retired, was a 
guest of Mrs. Brown at Cazenove last Friday. In the evening 
he spoke informally to the girls, giving a very delightful ac- 
count of the Philippines and his life there. 

About thirtjy-five former students of Colorado College are 
now studying in this part of the country. Several of them from 
Wellesley had a reunion in Boston Friday evening. Dr. Slo- 
cum, president of Colorado College, who preached at Wellesley 
on Sunday, was the guest of honor. 

Professor Kuhnemann of Harvard, will give a talk on 
Schiller next Monday, reading from "Maria Stuart." Professor 
Kuhnemann is considered one of the authorities on Schiller and 
the best reader in Germany. 

The following heads of sports have been elected : of Hock- 
ey, Elizabeth Robinson ; of Tennis, Helen MacDonald ; of Golf, 
Kate Cushman ; of Running, Edith Mills ; of Archery, 
Isadore Douglas. 

At a meeting of the Cross Country Walking Club held 
last week the following officers were elected: Miss H. Larri- 
more, president; Miss Mills and Miss Edsall, executive com- 
mittee. It is hoped that the club will have a flourishing year. 
The walks come on Monday mornings, and there are no restric- 
tions to memberships, no dues, and no regulations. 



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A Scallop Shell of Quiet 

President Hazard's book of sonnets is on sale at the 
college bookstore at eighty cents a copy, to members of 
the college. 




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COLLEGE NEWS 



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* 



Miss Rawn's Work in Piedmont College 

It is thought that the following extracts from a letter from 
Isabel Rawn, 100S, will be interesting to all Wellesley girls. 
We wish that space permitted the printing of the whole letter. 
Miss Rawn wrote in October, telling of her work and of the 
great need for help and sympathy, which we can give. The 
Missionary Committee was glad that an alumna looked to us 
so confidently for co-operation, and sent twenty-five dollars. 
Miss Rawn then writes : 

"Piedmont College, 

Demorest, Ga. 

November 2. 1908. 
Dear Miss Whiteside, 
Your letter of October 21st came to me a week ago : 
since when I have been eager, — more than eager — to tell you, 
as representing the Christian Association, what a fine thing it 
is to feel Wellesley behind me in the work here. 
******** 

Since I wrote to you, I have organized a squad to play 
basketball, among the girls. It is fine for them because no one 
ever taught them how to use and enjoy their bodies, and they 
need to be put in better physical trim. The narrow religious 
conceptions of these people, dear as they are, emphasize the 
importance of proprieties which seem to us petty, but which 
we are bound to respect. We can't ask them to learn grace 
through dancing, therefore, but basketball will give them some 
idea of form, and it is even healthier than dancing. All of 
which reminds me: if the barrel hasn't started yet, or even if 
it has. some of the girls might like to send some old gym 
suits and sweaters and gymnasium shoes. The children are too 
poor, you iid a penny needlessly, and, although those 

who take indoor physical culture lessons are supplied with 
bloomers, the majority of the girls are forced to play awk- 
\\ ardly in some old skirt. 

Did I tell you about Jessie Hamilton and Eliza 
dale? They do the weaving and spinning. I wish 
you might see them, like two hand maids of Queen Ma- 
thilde with her Bayeux tapestry — before she began to do the 
embroidery of it, — with the great wooden loom, and the spin- 
ning wheels, the shafts of light in the room showing the air 
filled with bits of wool, and all the wonderful blue bed-spreads 
being woven to the tune of rhythmic thuds and the whirring of 
wheels. The portieres and spreads that they weave are of in- 
dicate pattern, going by such names as 'General Lee's Sur- 
render," the "'Double Bow Knot." These two children, the 
only ones in the school who are at all proficient in the quaint 
eld industry, spin all the wool that is used, card it, wash it, 
dye it, weave it. Eliza worked her passage through school, 
and until she grew less strong, that of her two small sisters. 
It was a brave thing for her to do because these mountaineers 
look down on manual work of any kind that brings pay, as 
only fit for the negroes. It is the prejudice which the 
school finds most difficult to overcome. And Jessie, — 



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Jessie was taken from an orphan home, though she has a worth- 
mother, living somewhere, — <he stays here at the school 
all summer, working to get money to stay through the winter, 
and I started to tell you about her because she wants to earn a 
gym suit by keeping the whitewash lines clearly marked out on 
the basketball held. That means her whole morning every 
Saturday in this country, where the heavy rains come down 
and paste a thick red shine over everything. Do send Jessie 
a gymnasium suit, and ask the girls to search through their 
belongings for pretty boxes, old finery, etc.. that will do for 
Christmas gifts. — and too, I wish you could think of a way to 
give Jessie a home in the north, at some place where she 
could learn to be self-supporting — perhaps learn millinery, as 
not good at books. She is eighteen, plucky, very charming 
and lovable, the sort of girl you would like to help. If she 
were given advantages in a northern home, she would make 
a delightful end to somebody's servant problem. As it is. she 
is homeless, and without any prospects for the time when she 
leaves here. 

Mr. Campbell, (once president of the college, now investi- 
gating social and educational conditions among the mountaineers 
on the Sage Foundation), suggested that Wellesley found a 
scholarship for a girl here. Fifty dollars would suffice to send 
a girl through the school year, as she could meet the balance 
of her expenses by doing domestic work. 
******** 

I told you about the little Sweet girls in my last letter. 
Some of your money has brought shoes, stockings and 
overshoes already for their poor bare feet. A primary teacher 
was buying them out of her own salary of about $12 a month. 
I told her about your gift, and that you would like the com- 
fortable feeling that you were putting warm stockings on the 
cold youngsters, so I am to pay her back when the money 
comes. We did a wild fandango of joy together, and in fact, 
I have made this whole district so enthusiastic for Wellesley 
that with propriety, I think I might start them off some 
day on the Wellesley cheer, and expect them to sound a hearty 
chorus. I can't stop, but I must, and again I am, 

Loyally yours, dear Christian Association, 
Isabel Rawn. 

Mi-;* Rawn also pleads for a missionary barrel, which is 
being prepared and will be sent immediately after Thanksgiving. 
Will you not contribute to it? They need clothing, thick and 
thin, (most especially shoes, stockings, overshoes), umbrellas, 
tablecloths and napkins for the dormitories, and always money. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



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Mission Study 

The work of the year has begun hopefully and successfully. 
Sixteen Mission Study classes have been started with an en- 
rollment of about one hundred. During the month of October, 
normal classes were conducted by members of the faculty and 
competent girls. 

This year the following courses are being offered : India, 
China, Home Missions, Lives of Famous Missionaries, The Re- 
ligions of the Mission Fields, Bible and Missions, and the Apol- 
ogetic of Missions. The Mission Study Committee extends to 
all those who have not joined classes, a most cordial invitation 
to do so now. The leaders will be most happy to welcome new 
members to their classes, and additional classes in India and 
The Religions of the Mission Fields may be started. To any 
who, for good reasons, feel that they cannot become regular 
members of a class, and yet are eager to enjoy the privileges 
and inspiration of the study of missions, the committee will 
be glad to give permission to attend classes as listeners. Will 
any who desire to join classes as regular members or as listeners 
kindly leave their names in the Christian Association Office? 

During the second semester, a course of six lectures on 
minions is to be given for the Freshmen, as this year it has 
been thought advisable that the Mission Study courses should 
not be open to Freshmen. 

The Missionary Library on the third floor of College Hall 
is open to all. On the Missionary Bulletin Board, near the 
book-case, lists of reference books for the different courses are 
posted. Attention is called to the letters from our college mis- 
sionary, Dr. Ruth Hume, which are posted on this bulletin 
board. It is hoped that the girls will read the letters and learn 
more directly of the great work Wellesley is doing through Dr. 
Hume, for the women and children of India. 

Katharine Stanley Hall 
Chairman Mission Studv Committee. 



phrase, "the privilege of college life." The spiritual side of 
our life here makes a special demand through the complexity 
bi interests and duties. By our chapel services, the Thursday 
evening meetings, and the Bible and Mission Study classes, this 
demand is met. Miss Han ford next spoke of the social life 
at college. For the opportunity of making friends and doing 
our utmost for them, and for our dependence on each other, 
we should be deeply grateful. Then, too, all our life here is 
made easier by the beauty of the world about us, the chance 
of being near to God in the physical world. Miss Hanford 
said that what we have really come to college for is the broad- 
ening of our life intellectually. The wide range of ideas, the 
glimpses of new paths to follow for ourselves — these are all 
- through the privileges of college life. 

At the vesper service, Sunday, November 29. Mr. Robert 
Speer will speak on the general purpose and call of missions. 

Perhaps all the girls do not know that the Christian Asso- 
ciation subscribers for the two magazines, "The Intercollegian," 
and "The Association Monthly.'' These contain most inter- 
esting accounts of the different branches of association work 
being done in other colleges, and it is hoped that the members 
of our association will take the time to read them. They trill 
alwavs be found on the table in the association office. 



Christian Association 

A Thanksgiving Meeting of the Christian Association was 
held Thursday, November 19, in College Hall Chapel. Miss 
Ruth Hanford spoke of the real meaning of the much-used 



Notice— Legendas ! ! ! ! 

Will all alumnae who wish to purchase copies of the 1009 
Legenda fill out the following blank and return it before Satur- 
day, December 5, to Dorris S. Hough, 34 Beebe Hall, Wellesley. 
The price, including mailing to any part of the United States 
and Canada is Si. 75. 

Don't miss this opportunity to buy the handsomest and 
most unique Legenda which has ever been published in Welles- 
ley. 

I wish to order copies of the Legenda. 

Name 

Address 



COLLEGE NEWS 



WHY DO THE ICES AND DRIiNKS 

— AT— 

Washington Street 

Near Summer) 
TASTE SO MUCH BETTER THAN ELSEWHERE 



JOYf/vfef5 4 ' 



For elegant and good style Millinery buy at 

MRS. M. A. GRACE'S 

165 Tremont Street - BOSTON 



JOHN T 


RYAN 


Notary Public 

and 

Justice of the Peace 


Room 1. II 


Block. Wellesley 



JOHN A. MORGAN & CO. 

Pharmacists 

SHATTUCK BUILDING 

WELLESLEY 

L A. KINNEAR 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

w The Wellesley 
vi, Grocery Go. 

SMontague Block 
VELLESLEY MASS. 

F. DIEHL, JR. 

Boarding and Livery 

Stable 

WELLESLEY - MASS. 

CBmULTJLUMKM 

Ladies' and Gents' 

CUSTOM TAILORS 

Suits made to order, perfect fit guar- 
Dyeing. Pressing. Repairing 

zni Altering neatly done. 



36 Central St. 



Wellesley 



H. L. FLAGG 

Daily Papers, Periodicals 

Stationery, Etc. 

WRIGHT 4DITS0H SPORTING GOODS 
Montague Block Wellesley Sq. 

Wellesley Tailoring Co. 

M. STFARTZ, Manager 

Ladies' & Gents' Tailors & Furriers 

Cleaning. Dyeing, Pressing 

i.-.i Rcr = :r:r.? 

543 Washington St WELLESLEY, MASS. 
Telephone No. 349-2 

NL G. SHAW 

Watchmaker and Optician 

Agent for the Provident Life 

and Trust Co. 

WELLESLEY - - MASS. 



Parliament of Fools 



A Zoo Shade 

I? this a cra^-fish which I see before me. 

From forceps dangling down? With head dissevered, 

And gills in disarray? Come, let me clutch thee! 

I have thee not. and yet I see thee still. 

Thou showest me much knowledge unacquired. 

And such an instrument I was to use. 

I ?ee thee yet. in form as palpable 

As Kohinoor 6H can draw, — 

And on thy carapace are gouts of blood, 

Which was not so before. 



Student Recital 



Piano: Bouree in b minor. 



Bach-Saint Saens 



Miss Elizabeth I. Kriebel, 1912 
Waltz. Op. 69. No. 1. 

Miss Margaret A. Fuller, 191 1 
Voice : "Come, sweet morning" 

'Wenn ich friih in den garten geh" 
"Dormi pure" 

Miss Ruth A Howe, 191 1 
Serenade 

Miss Olive C. McCabe, 1909 
Alia Stella confidente 

Miss Ruth A. Howe, 191 1. 
("violin obligate by Miss Man.- Welles, 191 1) 
Gavichord : Minuet in B flat. 

Miss Gertrude N. Cook, 1910 

Piano: Poem, after Heine. Oo. 31. N MacDowett 

Miss Katherine M. Mortenson, 1912 



Piano 
Voice : 



Chopin 

Arr. by A. L. 

Schumann 

Scudere 

Jensen 

Robaudi 



Bach 



Sunday Evening Vespers 

Processional : 632. 

Hvmn : 740. 

Service Anthem: The Strain Upraise 

Psalm: 104 (Gloria Patri) 

Violoncello: Adagio 

Consolations. No S 
Organ : Benediction nuptiale 
Violoncello : Adagio 
Recessional : 16. 

The Wellesley College Choir 

Solo — Miss Wheeler 

Violoncello— Mr. Carl Barth 

Organist — Professor Macdougall 



Buck 

Corelli 

Lissi 

Dubois 

Mozart 



Theatre Notes 

Park Theatre — Hook of Holland ; 

Tremont Theatre — The Merry Widow. 

Matesttc Theatre — Myself-Bettina. 

Hollts Street Theatre— Call of the North. 

Colonial Theatre— The Honor of the Family. 

Chickering Hall— Beatrice Herford. November 28. 



College Students 

Falling Hair and Dandruff successfully 
treated, Manicuring, Chiropody, Electri- 
cal, Vibratory, Facial & Scalp Massage, 
Shampooing and Waving. Latest An- 
tiseptic Methods. Tel. 122-1 

I. L. BLISSARD, THE NORMAN 

Over E. B. Parker's Shoe Store 




The Walnut Hill School 

Natick, Mass. 
A College Preparatory School for Girls 

Miss Conant and Miss Bigelow 
Principals 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 North Ave., Natick 

High Grade Portraits 

Connected by Telephone 

Pianos for Rent 



* 



DERBY'S 

PIANO 

ROOMS 



Clark's Block 



Natick 



WELLESLEY FRUIT STORE 

Wellesley Square 

(where the cars step). Carries a full 
line of Choice Fruit. Confectionery and 
other goods, and Vegetables of all kinds 
usually found in a first-class fruit store. 
Also Olive Oil. Free Delivery. 

Tel. 1 GEORGE BARKAS 



SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 New Faneuil Hall Market 
BOSTON 

HIGH GRADE 

MILLINERY 

and Ladles' Fine Neckwear 
COLLEGE HATS A SPECIALTY 

MISS H. W. MURRAY 
WELLESLEY SQUARE 

TAU.BY 

THE WELLESLEY FLORIST 

Office. 555 Washington St.— Tel. 44-2 
Conservatories, 103 Linden St.— Tel. 44-1 

Orders by Mail or Otherwise are Given 

Prompt Attention. 

J. TAILBY & SOS, Proprietors 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

JAMES KORNTVED 

Ladies' and Gents' 

Custom Tailor 

Shutv Block Wellesley Square 

Special Attention paid to 
Pressing and Cleaning 



Qlcllcslcy Inn 

KUlUdley, JVIaee. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



OOOKI'S Restaurant 

88 BO YL ST ON STREET 

Next to Colonial Theater 

Matinee Lunches 



*/§??£ 




WE ASK ATTENTION TO OUR HAND-MADE 

Shaker Sweaters, Coat Style 

WE ESPECIALLY RECOMMEND THEM TO COL1 EGE WOMEN 



Ask for our Endless Chain Book so you can get your second pair Free 

Sample Shoe 
& Hosiery Shop 

Have only TWO Shops in 
BOSTOS 

496 Washington St. cor. 

Bedford St. and 
74 Boylston St. cor. Tre- 

mont St. Both stores up one flight 

Our prices S2.03 anj $2.50 a pair for 
54.00 an J $5.00 grades 
Newest Styles in Boots, Oxfords and Slippers 
We carry full line of Sample Hosiery, including Lisle, Cotton 
and Silk, at Half Price. Our prices 2lc'to $1.00 a pair for silk hose 





Mail Orders given careful and 
prompt attention 



^q Washington and 

'fy/!jXy7'/r£. Summer Streets 



iSSTdSS BAILEY, BANKS & BIDDLE CO. 



Free Press 

The disciples of the Planchette Board and the students of 
esoteric wisdom are increasing, — hence a timely word of warn- 
ing. Those who yearn to lift the mystic veil of Isis pay a 
heavy penalty". Telementation, concentration, will-projection, 
arcana, etheric vibrations are vampires in sapping strength. 

An all absorbing interest in thought-forms and their ma- 
terialization has a hypnotic influence which leaves a lasting 
effect net only- on a medium's every day work, but on her 
mental and physical forces as well Psychic phenomena safo 
within the backs of a conservative psychology are harmless. 
Unloosened they are hosts to be reckoned with. For the same 
healthy student occult realms are best unexplored. College 
is a place for thinking living thoughts, for sleeping wholesome 

•l work. Acrobatic knowledge ha? 
no place in such a regime. 

Fascinating it may be to invoke spirits out of space, 
to conjure up affinities, to reveal fantastic futures — yet to 
those who cannot indulge in the luxury of hysteria and neuro- 
tics — Beware ! 



Additions to Library 

Bahrens, E. ed., Poetae latini minores. 

Baumker, Clemens ; Das problem der materie in der griechischen 

philosophic 
Baldwin. J. M., Thought and things. 
Claretie, Leo; J. J. Rousseau et ses amis. 
Cobb, Palmer, Influence of E. T. A. Hoffman on the tales of 

Poe. 
Cohen, Hermann; Kants Theorie der erfahrung. 
Condillac, E. B. de, Oeuvres philosophiques. 
Cornill, C. H. ed., Das buch Jeremia 
Crosby, W. O., Notes on chemical geology. 
Emerson, Edwin, Nineteenth century and after. 
Fischer, Kuno, Goethe's Tasso. 

Flechsig, Paul , Die localisation der geistigen vorgange. 
France, Anatole , Le lys rouge. 
France, Anatole . Monsieur Bergeret a Paris. 
Genocchi, Angelo ; Differentialrechnung u. grundzuge d. in- 

tegralrechnung. 

Notice to Contributors to College News 

Copy for College News should be handed in when possible 
by Thursday afternoon. It should be written on one side of 
the page and in ink. The departments are in charge of the fol- 
lowing editors : General Correspondence — Emma Hawkridge. 
College Notes, College Calendar — Isadore Douglas. Art Notes, 
Music Notes, Society Notes — Carolyn Wilson. Sports, Free 
Press— Elizabeth Snyder. Parliament of Fools — Kate Parsons. 



General Secretary Pledges 

As many girls did not remember to pay their General 
Secretary Pledges and their membership dues on Pay Day, an 
opportunity will be given for them to pay such dues at the 
elevator table, during the week beginning December I. All 
are urged to comply with this request. 



has just issued and will send free upon request 

A NEW CATALOGUE OF 
COLLEGE and SCHOOL EflBLEilS 

wnich contains illustrations ani prices of a very large assortment 
of Class and College Pins (in colors to represent enamel), Frater- 
nity Emblems. Seals, Plaques, Medals, Rings and manv novelties 
in the newest styles— suggestions that should be seen before pur- 
chasing. 



1218=20=22 Chestnut St. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



TURNER CENTER DAIRYING 
ASSOCIATION^- 
33 Fulton St., Cor. Cross 

BOSTON 

Telephone, 207 Richmond 



DAMASCENE 

The Turkish Sweetmeat 
Send 10 cts. for Sample 

DAMASCENE MFG. CO. 

Box 447 Newark, N. J. 



Every Requisite for a 

2)atnt£ Xuncb 

AT 

COBB, BATES & YERXA CO. 

55 to 61 5ummer St. 

Only one block from Washington St.) 



BOSTON AMUSEMENTS 



Keitll'S ^r Thanksgiving week Stella MayfieW 

Her last appearance at this house was ine of the events of tht 
season and her return will be welcomed. A special extra performance will be 
given on Thanksgiving morning beginning at ten o'clock and lasting until one. 
These morning performances on holidays have become the most popular feature 

-Vs. 



Dnotnn Thanksg: 1 he rural drama ''QLu Corm'' 

OUolUII ~ y EdwarJ Kidder. It was one of the most OR? 101111 

popular of last season's successes as given by the 
and the present production will be on an even greater scale. The storv of the 
play is one of intense interest, and the love story that runs throughout the 
piece is enough to hold the attention from start to finish. 



LOST 



Between Wellesley Inn, Morgan's Drug 
Store and iS Grove Street, a string of 
Gold Beads. Return to 18 Grove Street. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Wellesley 
National BanK 

Will rent safe deposit boxes at $5.00 
per year giving rent FREE until 
JAN. 1st, 1909, to all who take 
boxes before that date. 

Fully protected against fire and 
burglary. 

Come and see our vaults. 

ISAAC SPRAGUE, Prest. CHAS. N. TAYLOR, V. Prest. 

B.W.GUERNSEY, Cashier 



Alumnae Notes 

In addition to notes concerning graduates, the Alumnae 
column will contain items of interest about members of the 
Faculty, past and present, and former students. 

Mis? Sophie Hart, of the Department of English, who 
succeeds Mrs. Ethel Puffer Howes, as director of the Boston 
Branch of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae, addressed the 
branch at its meeting on November 21. 

Miss Jewett, of the Department of English Literature, 
spoke before the Hartford Wellesley Club on November 7 upon 
"News from Wellesley." 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society has published in 
pamphlet from a report of the Committee on Children's 
Gardens for the year 1907, by Henry Saxton Adams, of the 
Department of Botany at Wellesley, chairman of the committee. 

Miss May E. Taft, 1908, is teaching in the Bellowsville 
(Vt.) High School. 

Miss Alice C. Hopkins, 1908, is teaching English and Latin 
in the High School at Buffalo Centre, Iowa. 

Miss Olive Davis, B. S. 1886, director of the Halls of 
Residence, at Wellesley, addressed the Middlesex Club of Low- 
ell November 13, on "Conservation of Time and Energy in the 
Home." 

Miss Betsey Baird, 1908, spoke before the Springfield- 
Wellesley Club, October 31, on the need of a Students' Build- 
ing at Wellesley. 

Miss Adelaide H. Bent, 1907, spent the summer in Europe. 

Miss Gertrude Wilbur, 1907, is teaching in the Old Town 
(Me.) High School. 

Miss Cora Butler, 1904, is teaching in the St. Louis High 
School. 

Miss Margaret Dakin, 1907, is resident tutor in a family 
in Radnor, Pa. 

Miss Lillian Wye, 1908, is teaching in Palmer, Mass. 

Miss Frances Davis, 1908, is teaching in the Lanesboro, 
(Minn.) High School. 

Miss Anna M. Young, 1905, is engaged in Y. W. C. A. 
work. 

Miss Beulah Johnson, 1004, is teaching in the Leominster 
(Mass.) High School. 




COATS 

For Well Dressed 
WOMEN 

Are now on sale in our great Suit and Coat 
Department 

About 40 of the Newest Coat Models, black 
and all the new shades 

The fit and workmanship could not be improved 
in coats at $60 to $75 — our special price — 

$25.00 

Every "Wooltex" coat guaranteed for Two 
Seasons' satisfaction 

Sold exclusively in Boston by 

R. H. WHITE CO. 



Miss Mary Robinson, 1901, is a resident of Denison House 
this winter. 

Miss Isabel Rawn, 1908, is teaching in Piedmont College, 
Demorest, Ga., a college for mountain boys and girls who have 
to work their way. 

Miss Marion Taylor, 1895, received the degree of Ph. D. 
from the Chicago University, Magna cum Laude, at the August 
Convocation. She is teaching German in the Eastern District 
High School, Brooklyn. 



Engagements 
Miss Hilda K. Garson, 1907, to Mr. Bernard E. Loreman, 
of Chattanooga, Tenn. 



Marriages 

Keelor — Biddle. November 4, 1908. in Atlantic City, N. J., 
Miss Agnes Marie Buckingham Biddle, 1907, to Mr. Charles 
Edgar Keelor. At home after January 1, Warren, Pa. 

Lushear — Schott. September 1908, at Jersey City, N. J., 
Miss Katherine Elizabeth Schott, formerly of 191 1, to Mr. F. 
Herbert Lushear. 



Births 

September 14, 1908, in Chicago, a daughter, Ruth Sibley, 
to Mrs. Henry Hoyt Hilton, (Charlotte T. Sibley, 1891). 

November 11, 1908, a daughter, Margaret Dickson, to Mrs. 
Joseph M. Adams (Alice E. Dalrymple, 1903). 



Deaths 
November 7, 1908, at West Newton, Mass, Mr. G. A. Wal- 
ton, father of Miss Alice Walton, of the Department of Latin. 



Change of Address 

Miss Gare M. Howard, Girton College, Cambridge, Eng- 
land. 

Mrs. Ovan W. Ott, (Annie V. Luff, 1904), 251 E. 3rd 
South, Salt Lake City. 

Miss Ruth Stevens, 1907, The Collinson, 225 West End 
Ave., New York City.